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Background

Building an Internet of Things project often relies on the well-established client-server architecture at scale. When the term was first used, it referred to users as the client, requesting to run jobs from a central computer, i.e. the server. [1] Nowadays, with IoT, clients are the edge devices requesting data to be stored/processed by a server. Although, in theory, a single server could handle a small batch of IoT devices, a sudden surge of device requests could easily overwhelm the server and affect availability and data integrity.

This is where distributed computing coupled with a microservice architecture comes in.

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When you think of say, an audio signal or waveform, you think of this, right?

waveform

 Figure 1: Audio waveform in the time domain. 

Figure 1 depicts an audio signal in the time domain; essentially a visualisation of the variation of the signal’s amplitude (plotted on the y-axis) over time (plotted on the x-axis). So, by observing the signal in this way, how much information can actually be extracted[1]?

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If you haven't read previous blog posts about this, we're taking 7 UTC Reading Students through the entire process of fully developing a customer idea and creating a working prototype IoT product to meet all the customer requirements in 4 weeks. Monday 6 August saw the beginning of this brilliant project.

6 Students from UTC Reading (one is on holiday but will join us from next week), all arrived promptly at Innovation Catalyst's amazing facility at the Thames Valley Science Park, looking eager, suited and booted and wanting to know what would be in store for them...

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